East german spies

Infamously known as “the Falcon and the Snowman,” this unlikely duo somehow managed to create a serious hole in the national security of the US government in the 1970s through their low-profile efforts. Boyce, who was working for an aerospace company on contract with the US government, stumbled upon some top secret information. He decided to sell the information to the Soviets by trafficking the intelligence through his friend Lee, a drug-runner, who would sell them to the Russian embassy in Mexico. However, when Lee was arrested for an unrelated charge, their scheme was uncovered.

Münster interested the Stasi for two reasons: It was both an important stronghold for the center-right political party Christian Democratic Union (CDU) in the state of North Rhine-Westphalia and a university town with a left-wing scene. Stasi boss Erich Mielke had his agents seek out unofficial collaborators to work within the conservative political establishment. They attached themselves to the police and armed forces and worked their way into the political system. They also recruited students, promising young talents who might one day rank among West Germany's leaders, and thus become important informants for the GDR.

These East German spies' motivation varied enormously. For many the decision to spy was provoked by a deep-seated attitude of anti-communism. But others did so out of adventurism, or due to family ties, or simply as a favor to old army buddies from the war. There was also some financial compensation, though the study's authors believe this was less important as a motivation, particularly as it was impossible to spend West German money in the East. "Bank accounts were sometimes opened in their names so that if they ever left the GDR they would have some start-up capital," Wagner says.

The German born Guellich came to America in 1932, and was recruited by Griebl in 1935 due to his work as a metallurgist at the Federal Shipbuilding Co. in Kearney, NJ. Because of his position in the laboratory, Guellich had access to secret and restricted projects developed for the . Navy, including guns and shells, destroyer blueprints, and samples of cables used on ships. The material was sent to Griebl, who forwarded it to Germany. It wasn’t long before Guellich’s diligence earned him a top spot in the Nazi spy network.

East german spies

east german spies

The German born Guellich came to America in 1932, and was recruited by Griebl in 1935 due to his work as a metallurgist at the Federal Shipbuilding Co. in Kearney, NJ. Because of his position in the laboratory, Guellich had access to secret and restricted projects developed for the . Navy, including guns and shells, destroyer blueprints, and samples of cables used on ships. The material was sent to Griebl, who forwarded it to Germany. It wasn’t long before Guellich’s diligence earned him a top spot in the Nazi spy network.

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